Hello, and welcome to the final part of my guide on how to win at the Game of Thrones board game. If you have missed any of the previous parts, they can be found below:

- Part 1- Territory Control and House Cards

- Part 2- Combat, Managing Troops and Power Tokens

- Part 3- Stark and Greyjoy

- Part 4- Lannister and Baratheon

- Part 5- Tyrell and Martell

7: Taking The Win

“In War.

Prize victory,

Not a protracted campaign.”

Sun Tsu, Waging of War

So, having discussed general strategy and potential issues for each house I am now going to look at making the winning move. There are two ways to win; take a 7th castle, or hold the most castles at the end of the game. Depending on the house you are playing is as the best option will vary.

In this article we will look at the strategies for the two remaining houses, Tyrell and Martell. If you have missed any of the previous sections they can be found below:

- Part 1- Territory Control and House Cards

- Part 2- Combat, Managing Troops and Power Tokens

- Part 3- Stark and Greyjoy

- Part 4- Lannister and Baratheon

Tyrell:

One of the great things about the Game of Thrones board game is the focus on strategy over luck.

In this article we continue our look at the specifics of playing as each house. If you missed any of the previous articles, they can be found below:

- Part 1- Territory Control and House Cards

- Part 2- Combat, Managing Troops and Power Tokens

- Part 3- Stark and Greyjoy

Lannister:

Thematically enough, Lannister are undoubtedly the most controversial house on the board.

In this part I am going to start talking about the specifics of playing as each house. I have broken this discussion into 3 parts, as each house has a lengthy section attributed to it. In this first part we will look at Stark and Greyjoy (if you missed the previous parts, part 1 can be found here and part 2 here).

In the last part I talked about the key strategies relating to territory control and effective use of house cards. In this part I will talk in depth about effective combat strategy, how you should muster units, and how to manage and use power tokens with maximum efficiency.
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With the current Game of Thrones obsession still holding strong after several years in the limelight, and the season 6 finale having been and gone, a lot of people will be looking for a way to expand their Game of Thrones experience. Sure, you could turn to the books, and many have, but my first port of call will always be the first medium in which I encountered Westeros; the board game.

<< Issue 1

After my last riveting must-read article which walked through the process of installing Unity, we're going to start getting familiar with the 3D Editor. (Disclaimer: I've since got a licence for Pro Edition, but this shouldn't affect anything we're doing throughout these posts).

>> Issue 2

In my ongoing secret war with fellow 103% writer Ben Winterton to earn the title of Most Crushingly Dull Blog Post, we're going to install Unity Personal Edition in this post.

We've talked about games on this blog for years, so let's have a look at the process of making one. I'm going to try the Unity engine. The personal edition is free and there's any amount of resources and support for the platform.

Here at 103% Complete we strive to fill all the niches that everybody else misses, which seriously eats into our juicy clickbait revenues. As the title of this post suggests, we're looking to inform and entertain the audience intersection between those who are interested in the politics of veganism and those who enjoy videogames enough to read what I'd (generously) regard as an obscurely popular video game blog.

I was hankering for a new PC game when I came across Undertale on the Steam store. It has simple graphics and it was an indie title, so since that doesn't narrow it down much I checked the reviews and found that it had a whopping metacritic score of 98, from a considerably broad range of reputable enough sources.
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